All posts by Alina V. Vladimirova

Session “Power, Influence and Network Structures”

CALL FOR PAPERS
XXXVIII Sunbelt Conference
Session “Power, Influence and Network Structures”
June 26-July 1, 2018 | Utrecht, Netherlands
Deadline for Abstracts: February 1, 2018 (23.59 hrs. CET time)

Dear IPSA RC36 members and friends,

Please, consider submitting your abstract to the Sunbelt 2018 session “Power, Influence and Network Structures” organized by our research committee.

This session is organized in collaboration with IPSA Research Committee on Political Power (IPSA RC36) to provide a room for a broad discussion on opportunities and challenges of network analysis methods for political power scholars. We encourage potential participants to introduce papers that link theory to practice, propose systematic testing of theoretical models with network data and demonstrate original network approaches to analysis of diverse forms of power in changing conditions of domestic and international politics. We aim to attract empirical papers that based on different theoretical backgrounds (network-as-structure, networks-as-actors) and concepts of power (power-as-control and power-as-access, networking power, network power, networked power and network-making power). We are especially interested in papers covering topics connected to conceptualization and measures of power in networks, to analysis of nodal positions and to different issues associated with creation of indexes.

Submission Link: https://sunbelt.sites.uu.nl/abstract-submission/

Looking forward to your contributions!

Publication Alert: A Theory of War and Violence

On behalf of IPSA RC36 member Thomas Scheff we are sharing his work. Please, take a look!

A Theory of War and Violence

Thomas Scheff, G. Reginald Daniel, and Joseph Loe-Sterphone, Dept. of Sociology, UCSB

Abstract: It is possible that war in modern societies is largely driven by emotions, but in a way that is almost completely hidden. Modernity rationalizes the self and tends to ignore emotions, which can result in the total hiding of humiliation leads to vengeance. This essay outlines a theory of the social-emotional world implied in the work of C. H. Cooley, whose concept of the “looking-glass self” can be used as antidote to the assumptions of modernity: the self is based on “living in the mind” of others, resulting in feeling either pride or shame. This essay proposes that the complete hiding of shame can lead to feedback loops with no natural limit. These ideas may help explain the role of France in causing WWI, and Hitler’s rise to power in Germany. To the extent that these propositions are true, our civilization is in grave danger unless fundamental changes occur.
Keywords: shame, emotions, violence, war, C.H. Cooley, Erving Goffman

Read at SocArXiv Preprints